Teachers Teaching Teachers

February 24, 2016

Dakota College at Bottineau campus and instructors were the host site through NCEC professional education workshop.  The workshop was sponsored and funded through a collaboration of Dakota College at Bottineau, the WET project and Succeed 2020, a program created with a $25 million investment from Hess Corp.  Succeed 2020's overall objective is the successful transition from school to college and careers for all North Dakota students. Shelly Hoerer NCEC Professional Development Director comments on the opportunity to work with DCB, "It is always a pleasure to collaborate with the DCB in not only allowing us to facilitate our workshops on campus but also being able to collaborate and have such wonderful instructors work with our local regional teachers.  The resources are invaluable to the NCEC organization and the educators in our area."

High school and elementary school teachers were invited to learn hands-on teaching techniques in science.  Educators from St. John, Westhope, MLS - Mohall, Lansford, Sherwood, TGU Granville, TGU Towner, Bottineau and Drake - Anamoose attended.  Michelle Pigeon, Bottineau, "I really appreciate the workshop today.  The information was very valuable and it was great to come back with the actual resources!"

Angie Bartholomay, Larry Brooks and Chuck Lura, DCB instructors taught the workshops. The instructors delivered lessons from the WET project tying in ND state standards in Science, Math and English Language Arts. Larry Brooks, Dean for Academic Services felt the day was successful, “I enjoyed working with the teachers during the workshop. They were eager to learn about the role of macroinvertebrates is assessing water quality and were actively engaged in the lab exercises.  I look forward to the opportunity to offer additional environmental education teacher workshops.”

Activities performed with the teachers included:

  • Macro-invertebrate Bio-assessment of a stream to determine water quality
  • Modeling Bio-assessment to learn monitoring techniques in the classroom before doing field monitoring
  • Microscope Use – teachers were given microscopes to take with them to use in their classrooms
  • Water-cycle graphing activity

Technology was incorporated into the day by using iPads to conduct an activity to graph results from the activities.


DCB's Wayne Thomas Receives Professional Development Grant

February 23, 2016

waynethomas-190x237.jpgIn support of his efforts to enhance the artistic quality of his work through lifelong learning,
Wayne Thomas has been awarded a $750 Professional Development Grant by the North Dakota
Council on the Arts (NDCA).

Wayne Thomas is the head of North Dakota’s premiere commercial photography program at
Dakota College at Bottineau.

The NDCA’s Professional Development Grant program is designed to benefit artists by providing financial assistance for informational/educational opportunities relating to the arts and arts development. Arts organizations also benefit from the program through grants to aid in providing staff/board/volunteer training opportunities or for hiring consultants and technical or artistic directors.

The grant will provide funds to help Wayne Thomas attend the Wedding and Portrait
Photographers International Expo and Convention in Las Vegas, Nevada, where he will attend master classes with leading industry photographers and videographers, explore new equipment offered through the expo and meet with colleagues to discuss new techniques.

“This grant will help me be a better photographer and videographer,” says Thomas. “My work
will benefit with a fresh look at current trends in the industry. It will be a great time to watch
experts take on some of the same tasks I do, but in a different way that might save time or
bring more creativity to my own workflow.”ndcouncilartslogo.png

This project is supported in part by a grant from the North Dakota Council on the Arts, which
receives funding from the state legislature and the National Endowment for the Arts. In
addition, Wayne Thomas gratefully acknowledges others who made this opportunity possible, including Dakota College at Bottineau.

The application deadline for Professional Development Grants is four weeks prior to the start of the activity. For more information, contact the Council on the Arts at 701-328-7594 or visit www.nd.gov/arts.

Dakota College at Bottineau offers a 1 year certificate or a 2 year degree, DCB takes
students from beginner level through classes that prepare them for a career in portrait, wedding or advertising photography. Classes are offered in person at the Bottineau campus or online. Visit our photography page or call (701) 228-5488 or toll free at (800) 542-6866 to enroll or find out more.


Grant Expands Distance Education

February 9, 2016

BrooksLarry-190.jpgLarry Brooks has been successfully teaching through the interactive video network for 20 years. A new grant will help upgrade the IVN system, deliver courses to students who would normally not have access to them, bring in more revenue and increase collaboration among campuses.

The assistant professor of biology and associate dean for academic affairs at Dakota College at Bottineau has been teaching through IVN since it started being used as a delivery method two decades ago. He’s taught numerous courses, including Anatomy and Physiology I and II, Human Structure and Function, and Water Resource Management. Now, the grant awards totaling more than $505,000 will help to expand on those course deliveries.

Brooks said that the upgrade as applied at his college was most welcome – that although some students might feel a bit anxious at first about the nontraditional course delivery method, they adapted very well to the IVN was of classroom instruction.

“I highly recommend instructors visit the distant sites during the first two-three weeks of each term to help strengthen the student-instructor relationship,” he said, adding that further site visits were always encouraged.

For Brooks the classrooms stay fairly manageable even at a distance. Average overall was around 10 at two distant sites. For his classes it ranged from 10-13 at five or six sites, in addition to 15-20 on-campus students. The greatest benefits to teaching through IVN, from Brooks’ perspective, was that it allowed campuses to deliver courses to students who would otherwise not have access to them – such as students from rural settings.

“The IVN system has been invaluable for DCB to increase its dual credit capacity and to provide instruction to distant sites in Minot and Valley City where DCB offers multiple programs,” he said. “The IVN system allows campuses to expand course offerings while increasing efficient use of faculty resources. Offering classes via IVN increases students headcount which leads to increased tuition collection and enhanced program and campus viability.”

Brooks added that because of IVN-delivered courses, DCB was able to collaborate with other campuses on some programs and classes.

“For example, the Dakota Nursing Program is a consortium of four state colleges (Bismarck State College, DCB, Lake Region State College and Williston State College) who use the IVN system to deliver shared didactic courses and to conduct faculty and administrative meetings,” Brooks said. “The Northern Information Technology Consortium is a consortium of three state colleges (DCB, LRSC and WSC), one tribal college (Turtle Mountain Community College), and one four-year regional university (VCSU) who use the IVN system to cross-list and share IT courses. The IVN system allows both consortia to maximize efficiency and effectiveness through the use of shared resources via the IVN.”

Collaboration is vital as it can lead to the expanding of knowledge bases and the sharing of services. But, the implementation of IVN is focused first on providing distance education. Many students have been able to take courses they’d otherwise have missed out on. One DCB student, Megan Saville, is taking full advantage of those courses.

Saville is now in her last semester at DCB, where she’s finishing her associates degree in Elementary Education. Saville has had a handful of education courses through IVN. For the most part she was happy with her experience.

“I benefitted by having students from other sites input in conversation and discussion,” she said.

Betty Tykwinski, the site manager/nursing instructor for DCB at VCSU, said IVN had been integral to the nursing program’s success. She considered herself to be a novice to the process of teaching through IVN, having just started this year after teaching in traditional classrooms since 2011. Each college involved in the Dakota Nursing Program consortium (BSC, DCB, LRSC and WSC) has distant sites, as well as clinical and lab instructors. Tykwinski serves as a didactic instructor for the VCSU site and teaches through IVN to all the sites – reaching a total of 98 Practical Nursing students and 89 Associate Degree Registered Nursing students.

“All of the theory courses for the Dakota Nursing Program are delivered over the IVN system, so when I teach my class I only have my Valley City students in front of me,” she said. “They attend the afternoon lecture, so when I teach in the morning I have no students in the classroom with me, just those over IVN.”

She felt the benefit to an IVN-delivered class, which could have as many as 50 students enrolled, was in how the offering extended the reach of the program.

“The program is very unique and has allowed many students to become nurses in a nontraditional way – the majority of our students have families, jobs and other responsibilities that would prevent them from attending the traditional nursing program, especially those in the smaller rural areas such as Hazen and Harvey, even here in Valley City,” she said. “The IVN system allows the program to pool faculty resources from each of the sites to deliver a high quality program.”

According to Jerry Rostad, assistant CIO of Core Technology Services, that funding will go toward upgrading 35 Interactive Video Network classrooms through eight institutions. The grant money comes through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Utility Service program.

“This grant [program] has been around for some time and we knew the value it provided,” Rostad said. “Concurrently, a lot of our IVN equipment was nearing end of life, and so we figured the USDA would support the continued operation of our successful video network.”

The IVN classrooms can be set up in about a day; classes or events such as meetings can be scheduled for any time in the future. The institutions of Dakota College at Bottineau, Dickinson State University, Lake Region State College, Mayville State University, North Dakota State College of Science, North Dakota State University, Valley City State University and Williston State College will all receive upgrades. Rostad said the other four institutions – located in Bismarck, Fargo, Grand Forks and Minot – did not meet the rural requirements of the grant.


Larry Brooks has been successfully teaching through the interactive video network for 20 years. A new grant will help upgrade the IVN system, deliver courses to students who would normally not have access to them, bring in more revenue and increase collaboration among campuses.

The assistant professor of biology and associate dean for academic affairs at Dakota College at Bottineau has been teaching through IVN since it started being used as a delivery method two decades ago. He’s taught numerous courses, including Anatomy and Physiology I and II, Human Structure and Function, and Water Resource Management. Now, the grant awards totaling more than $505,000 will help to expand on those course deliveries.

Brooks said that the upgrade as applied at his college was most welcome – that although some students might feel a bit anxious at first about the nontraditional course delivery method, they adapted very well to the IVN was of classroom instruction.

“I highly recommend instructors visit the distant sites during the first two-three weeks of each term to help strengthen the student-instructor relationship,” he said, adding that further site visits were always encouraged.

For Brooks the classrooms stay fairly manageable even at a distance. Average overall was around 10 at two distant sites. For his classes it ranged from 10-13 at five or six sites, in addition to 15-20 on-campus students. The greatest benefits to teaching through IVN, from Brooks’ perspective, was that it allowed campuses to deliver courses to students who would otherwise not have access to them – such as students from rural settings.

“The IVN system has been invaluable for DCB to increase its dual credit capacity and to provide instruction to distant sites in Minot and Valley City where DCB offers multiple programs,” he said. “The IVN system allows campuses to expand course offerings while increasing efficient use of faculty resources. Offering classes via IVN increases students headcount which leads to increased tuition collection and enhanced program and campus viability.”

Brooks added that because of IVN-delivered courses, DCB was able to collaborate with other campuses on some programs and classes.

“For example, the Dakota Nursing Program is a consortium of four state colleges (Bismarck State College, DCB, Lake Region State College and Williston State College) who use the IVN system to deliver shared didactic courses and to conduct faculty and administrative meetings,” Brooks said. “The Northern Information Technology Consortium is a consortium of three state colleges (DCB, LRSC and WSC), one tribal college (Turtle Mountain Community College), and one four-year regional university (VCSU) who use the IVN system to cross-list and share IT courses. The IVN system allows both consortia to maximize efficiency and effectiveness through the use of shared resources via the IVN.”

Collaboration is vital as it can lead to the expanding of knowledge bases and the sharing of services. But, the implementation of IVN is focused first on providing distance education. Many students have been able to take courses they’d otherwise have missed out on. One DCB student, Megan Saville, is taking full advantage of those courses.

Saville is now in her last semester at DCB, where she’s finishing her associates degree in Elementary Education. Saville has had a handful of education courses through IVN. For the most part she was happy with her experience.

“I benefitted by having students from other sites input in conversation and discussion,” she said.

Betty Tykwinski, the site manager/nursing instructor for DCB at VCSU, said IVN had been integral to the nursing program’s success. She considered herself to be a novice to the process of teaching through IVN, having just started this year after teaching in traditional classrooms since 2011. Each college involved in the Dakota Nursing Program consortium (BSC, DCB, LRSC and WSC) has distant sites, as well as clinical and lab instructors. Tykwinski serves as a didactic instructor for the VCSU site and teaches through IVN to all the sites – reaching a total of 98 Practical Nursing students and 89 Associate Degree Registered Nursing students.

“All of the theory courses for the Dakota Nursing Program are delivered over the IVN system, so when I teach my class I only have my Valley City students in front of me,” she said. “They attend the afternoon lecture, so when I teach in the morning I have no students in the classroom with me, just those over IVN.”

She felt the benefit to an IVN-delivered class, which could have as many as 50 students enrolled, was in how the offering extended the reach of the program.

“The program is very unique and has allowed many students to become nurses in a nontraditional way – the majority of our students have families, jobs and other responsibilities that would prevent them from attending the traditional nursing program, especially those in the smaller rural areas such as Hazen and Harvey, even here in Valley City,” she said. “The IVN system allows the program to pool faculty resources from each of the sites to deliver a high quality program.”

According to Jerry Rostad, assistant CIO of Core Technology Services, that funding will go toward upgrading 35 Interactive Video Network classrooms through eight institutions. The grant money comes through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Utility Service program.

“This grant [program] has been around for some time and we knew the value it provided,” Rostad said. “Concurrently, a lot of our IVN equipment was nearing end of life, and so we figured the USDA would support the continued operation of our successful video network.”

The IVN classrooms can be set up in about a day; classes or events such as meetings can be scheduled for any time in the future. The institutions of Dakota College at Bottineau, Dickinson State University, Lake Region State College, Mayville State University, North Dakota State College of Science, North Dakota State University, Valley City State University and Williston State College will all receive upgrades. Rostad said the other four institutions – located in Bismarck, Fargo, Grand Forks and Minot – did not meet the rural requirements of the grant.

Chancellor Hagerott to be Guest Speaker at DCB Book Read

February 5, 2016 

Mark Hagerott - NDUS Chancellor.jpgDr. Mark Hagerott, NDUS Chancellor, will discuss cyber security at the Dakota College at Bottineau Centennial Alumni Center at on Wednesday, February 17 at 7 P.M. as a part of the campus read project.

Dr. Hagerott’s presentation is one of the events within the 2015-2016 Dakota College campus read project which features, The Circle, a futuristic book about personal privacy in a world made transparent by a controlling internet. Previous events this year included a presentation on the available technical service on the DCB campus, a presentation on the dangers of social media and identity theft, and a student panel discussion regarding attitudes and usage of social media. The March presentation is Privacy vs. Transparency in Digital Media: Legal Issues.

Dr. Hagerott has read The Circle and has an interest in and knowledge of cyber world issues; he served as the senior civilian and deputy director of the Center for Cyber Security Studies at the Naval Academy and panel co-lead of the Defense Science Board.

Dakota College doesn’t charge for the book read presentation and invites the public to attend, and all are welcome to join the discussion whether or not they have read the book.